History of StrengthsFinder

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The StrengthsFinder test, developed by the Gallup organization (famous for its Gallup polls) first came into the public eye in 2001, thanks to the publication of Now, Discover Your Strengths. The self-help book was written by Marcus Buckingham and Donald Clifton, who was the chairman of Gallup.

Over 2 million copies of the StrengthsFinder book were sold, and individuals and teams began using the StrengthsFinder test to identify personal strengths.

Based on the notion that every person has certain strengths, StrengthsFinder has broken these strengths into 34 categories, or themes.

Each of the 34 strengths falls into one of four domains (areas): Executing, Influencing, Relationship Building, and Strategic Thinking.

To come up with the set of 34 strengths, the Gallup Organization initially interviewed more than 1.7 million professions, across a variety of fields. Gallup’s research led to the development of categories, which they labeled as “talent themes,” but most people refer to as strengths.

The StrengthsFinder test identifies a person’s top 5 strengths, and it’s based on “positive psychology,” or what is “right” about people, not “wrong” with them.

In 2004, the name of the personality assessment was changed to “Clifton StrengthsFinder,” in order to pay tribute to Don Clifton, who died in 2003.

In 2007, Gallup updated the test and released a new book, StrengthsFinder 2.0.

Recently, the StrengthsFinder name has been changed to CliftonStrengths assessment, but the actual test remains the same.

To learn more about StrengthsFinder, or to schedule a free StrengthsFinder consultation, please call (720) 312-8737, or e-mail contact@strengthscoachingandtraining.com.

Please make note: Based in Denver, Colorado, we’ve been helping individuals and teams use StrengthsFinder for more than 10 years.